All posts in “mobility training”

strength training for seniors using bench press

Senior Strength Training

“Life’s requires strength.  By now, you know this.” 

Dan Piper, Certified Personal Trainer, HKC Kettlebell Instructor, Workout4Results.com

1/3 of my athletes are seniors.  They are spirited, extremely interesting, and our conversations range from thought provoking to the ridiculous.  My Senior clients tend to have greater desire, a greater  need for strength, and much better adherence than the average gym goer.  But what can a senior do in the gym?

What does senior strength training look like?

You might be surprised, but a senior strength training workout looks no different than mine or your grandaughter’s – really.  Yes, we may lighten the load, and talk more about the old days when a hamburger cost a nickle, or talk about what it was like being a gunner in WWII, or to actually watch Elvis Perform, but essentially the workouts are the same.  They perform olympic lifts, they box, they do abdominal work, and lots of mobility work.  I love letting Charlie sock me in the gut when we “spar”, or watching my younger senior perform a perfect back squat – and I mean it!

I must admit I like having them around for other reasons also – I need the age old wisdom around me.  We all do.

Here’s an article about a 91 year old weightlifting record holder, named Sy Perlis, that you’re sure to enjoy!  91 Year Old Champion


Are you ready to follow the example set by Sy Perlis? Then why not book your ONE WEEK FREE TRIAL NOW?

By Dan Piper, CPT, RKC, FMS,  Workout4Results.com

Strength Training at Dan’s Barbell and Kettlebell Club, Alameda, CA

Kettlebells to rehabilitate back pain

Rehabilitate Back Pain with Kettlebells

Kettlebell Exercises Can Provide Therapy For Back and Neck Pain

Although many people with backaches and other pains shy away from weight lifting for fear of hurting themselves, studies show that strength training can reduce pain, and prevent reinjury. While most research has used traditional weight training exercises, researchers in Denmark set out to study whether a kettlebell workout offered therapeutic benefits to back pain sufferers.

The weights, named for their resemblance to a tea kettle with a looped handle, began showing up in American gyms about 15 years ago and have gained a popular following among exercise buffs looking for a quick full-body workout. Unlike traditional weight training, which typically focuses on lifting exercises, a kettlebell workout requires both swinging and lifting of the weights, which for beginners can be awkward and difficult to control.

In a study published last year, the Danish researchers recruited 40 pharmaceutical workers, mostly middle-aged women with back, shoulder and neck pain, who were randomly assigned to either a regular kettlebell workout or a control group that was simply encouraged to exercise. The first group trained with kettlebells in 20-minute sessions two to three times a week for eight weeks, according to the report, published in The Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health.

At the end of the study, the kettlebell exercisers reported less pain as well as improved strength in the trunk and core muscles, compared with the control group. Over all, working out with kettlebells reduced lower back pain by 57 percent and cut neck and shoulder pain by 46 percent.

The study’s senior author, Lars L. Andersen, a government researcher in Denmark, noted that workers who spend much of the day sitting are particularly vulnerable to back, shoulder and neck pain because they develop tightness and weak spots along the posterior muscle chain, which includes the muscles running from the lower back down to the glutes, hamstrings and calves. Kettlebell workouts strengthen the posterior muscle chain, and the increased blood flow to the back and leg muscles also may lessen pain by reducing the buildup of lactic acid, the authors wrote.

While isolation exercises like curls and presses have their benefits, kettlebell movements recruit multiple muscles and teach the body “to move as one unit,” said J.J. Blea, a certified kettlebell instructor and an owner of Firebellz in Albuquerque, one of the top kettlebell gyms in the country.

Because kettlebells can be difficult to control, it’s important to learn proper form from a certified instructor or a kettlebell class at a gym. The cornerstone of the kettlebell workout requires the exerciser to swing the kettlebell between the legs. In the Danish study, women started with a 17.5-pound kettlebell and men with a 26.5-pound kettlebell.

“When you’re doing a swing, you squeeze your quads, you squeeze your glutes, and you squeeze your abs,” said Mr. Blea. “By squeezing these muscles, you protect your back. It creates power, and it increases strength.”

Kettlebell training is also surprisingly aerobic. A study by the American Council on Exercise found that a 20-minute kettlebell workout burns about 21 calories per minute, the equivalent of running at a six-minute-mile pace.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/turning-to-kettlebells-to-ease-back-pain/?_r=0

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The Farmer’s Carry

Why perform The Farmer’s Carry for Strength Training?

Muscle Gain Workout using the Famer's Carry

 

The Farmer’s Carry is well known in strength training circles.  With the Farmer’s style, hold two heavy kettlebells with the palms face forward, as the arms are rotated and held externally, the lats and shoulders are flexed,  helping pack and hold the shoulders into their sockets, the shoulders are held back and downwards.  Pick a distance to walk, any distance, between 30-200 yards or longer.  Most of us have seen these in strongman events, like the “World’s Strongest Man”.  There are many practical applications for this.  As a matter of Fact,  some of the world’s top researchers recommend including these in every workout program for every athlete!

How to Integrate The Farmer’s Carry in your strength training routine –  The hows and whys:

1. Build Strength.  This exercise works every muscle in the human body.  The type of strength you are building is primal, as this exercise poses a challenge that modern man must re-create, and does not exist in our daily routines.   Continue Reading…

FMS Certified

How to Exercise Using the Functional Movement System (FMS)

FMS, the Functional Movement Screen and Certification, was originated by Gray Cook, one of the world’s foremost Physiotherapists.

gray cook kettlebells rehab functional movement FMS

Gray Cook MSPT, CSCS, OCS, RKC Kettlebell Instructor

Ouch!  Which exercises hurt, and cause us to forego them?  For many it’s the deadlift, or some version of the squat or lunge.  For others, it’s the the walkout.  Many hate doing the kettlebell get-up, due to poor hip movement patterns and limitations.  Guess what – there are exercises that I have serious hangups with also —-most trainers and athletes do. Continue Reading…

Kettlebells, Pickles, and Vodka (What I know about the bells)

female using kettlebells strength training programme

I was completely turned off to using them, when I first heard about kettlebells in  2005.  They were what MMA fighters used, and I wasn’t into that scene, that genre.  But the same reason I shied away, is the main reason I use them now, both for athletes I train and myself.  But first, I had to get my head around why fighters need to train with them. Below, I’ll explain a few things that I know for sure, about the bells.

Kettlebells build your strength from infinite angles, whereas dumbbells and barbells are more limited.  When you hold a bell, the handle lets you lift it in any direction, from any angle, as opposed to one direction at one angle.  Ultimately, this renders our traditional gym equipment as useless.  Furthermore, our gym equipment serves to further decondition us, relying less on our ancillary muscles, less on our core, and this actually weakens us, as much as does an office chair (see the similarity….YOU ARE SITTING DOWN).

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